Research

Read some of the latest national and international research and evaluation reports about workplace literacy and numeracy.

Concurrent Provision: Phase Two Evaluation

Anne Alkema, Skills Highway Research Manager 
November 2017

In June 2016 the Workplace Literacy and Numeracy (WLN) Fund was to extended to include industry trainees studying at Levels 1 and 2 on the New Zealand Qualifications Framework (NZQF). This became known as ‘concurrent provision’. In late 2016 the Phase One Evaluation of the uptake and impact of this policy change showed that five months after the introduction of the policy there was very little uptake of concurrent provision.

The Phase Two Evaluation conducted from August-October 2017 showed:

  • Successes:
    • A small increase in uptake since 2016.
    • Two ITOs have proactively developed formal relationships with providers whom they think have the skills to deliver in their sectors and are getting programmes underway in companies. 
    • Reported improvements in qualification completion by two ITOs with some trainees looking to progress to Level 3 qualifications. 
  • Challenges:
    • Lack of stronger uptake is attributed to a limited number of qualifications at Level 1 and 2 in some ITOs and the desire for the policy to be extended to include Level 3 qualifications.
    • Providers not being willing to deliver in workplaces where there are small numbers of trainees.
    • Providers finding it difficult to tap into the employer market or build relationships with ITOs.

Having ITOs working in the WLN space is a ‘disruption’ to previous ways of working in that it has placed ITOs in a brokerage role. If this approach was to be taken up by other ITOs it presents a business opportunity for providers and is a way for them to get into a market that was previously not open to them.

In terms of outcomes from the concurrent provision, there is an indication that completion rates are increasing as a result of employees being taught literacy and numeracy along with their qualifications. This is reported in two cases where concurrent provision has gone to scale in security and manufacturing companies. There are also reports that some of the workers are to progress to Level 3 qualifications. This in turn enhances their career opportunities.

Overall, there are indications that the concurrent provision policy is working for those who have been proactive and found ways to make it happen. However uptake can be improved by:

  • Extending the policy to Level 3 so a wider pool of trainees has access to literacy and numeracy training to support them in their qualifications and career pathway
  • Looking at ways that the WLN fund can better support employers where there are e.g., small numbers of trainees or trainees in rural areas, who are not currently able to access provision as there are no economies of scale for providers.

Read the full evaluation here

Foundation Skills Pilot Program Success – The Australian Industry Group 

In July 2017, The Australian Industry Group released a report Foundation Skills Pilot Program Success. The report describes the process and outcomes of workplace training programmes that included three Foundation Skills Units of Competency. The pilot programme was delivered to around 40 learners across three manufacturing workplaces in 2016. 

The outcomes from the training programmes were similar to those found in workplace literacy and numeracy programmes in New Zealand namely:
•    Improvements in trainees’ skill levels as measured against the Australian Core Skills Framework
•    In two of the three companies the trainees were awarded the Units of Competency
•    Trainees identifying areas for improvements in their company
•    Improved confidence and interaction around workplace health and safety
•    Improvements in the completion of production paper work
•    Improved communication skills.

The challenges for companies running programmes are also similar to those in New Zealand, including:
•    The cost of releasing staff in work time
•    Inconsistent attendance due to changing shifts
•    Company documentation written at higher levels than trainees could understand.

Read the full report here.

Employers’ Perspectives on Training: Three Industries

While not specifically about literacy and numeracy training programmes in workplaces this recent report from NCVER describes employers’ experiences of training in companies in the meat processing, transport and logistics sectors. These employers see ongoing training as critical to firm survival. Some also see it as necessary to meet regulatory requirements and recognise the contribution training makes to upskilling employees with low skills and and low or no qualifications.

The report concludes that employers’ decisions on training are affected by a number of factors. These include industry regulations; the quality of entry-level labour supply; conditions of work in the industry and labour turnover; the quality and flexibility of training providers; information about the training market; and, the availability of public subsidies for training. 
Read the full report here.

Workplace English, Language & Literacy: Research and analysis of issues within the Australian Retail Industry, September 2015

This recent Australian report looks at the literacy and numeracy requirements of the retail sector. The researchers found that employers didn’t recognise that literacy and numeracy was an issue in their workplaces, nor did they recognise the literacy and numeracy requirements of retail roles. The researchers conclude there is a need for literacy and numeracy training for entry level positions and for those workers who are promoted to higher level roles. 

Reach and Impact of the Workplace Literacy and Numeracy Fund in 2015/2016

As part of the research programme the Skills Highway team keeps track of what is happening in programmes funded through the Workplace Literacy and Numeracy Fund.

This brief summary comes from an analysis of data from TEO-led programmes in 2015-2016 and from the final reports of 18 employer-led programmes that were completed in 2016. In total it covers around 11,000 learners. Read the summary here.

A Framework for Meeting the Professional Development Needs of Tutors of Adult Numeracy in the Irish Further Education and Training Sector, NALA, 2015

The aim of this Framework is to improve the teaching and learning of numeracy in Ireland. It sets out ten components considered vital for ensuring that professional development (whether in terms of formal qualifications or non-accredited training) shapes tutors who are not only competent and confident, but who are able to give learners the support they deserve.

Read the document here.

International Workplace Literacy Policies

Anne Alkema, Skills Highway Research Manager 
February 2017

The Skills Highway team has been having a look at what is happening internationally in relation to improving the adult literacy and numeracy skills of workers through government funded programmes. Across Australia, Canada, England, Ireland, and Scotland:

  • countries are taking an integrated approach that sees literacy and numeracy incorporated into wider foundation and vocational skills programmes. As such it is difficult to know how much emphasis there is on literacy and numeracy in workplace programmes
  • while the countries have literacy and numeracy / foundation skills strategies which aim to improve the skill levels of adults, there has generally been a reduction in funding for workplace literacy programmes
  • Canada and Australia are investing in resources to support employers
  • charitable trusts have been set up in Canada and England to help employers understand more about the benefits of foundation skills.

Read the summary report here.

Workplace Literacy Fund: Employer-led Outcomes Report 2013-2015

Prepared for the Tertiary Education Commission
Anne Alkema, Skills Highway Research Manager 
August 2016

This report examines the extent to which Workplace LN funding contributed to outcomes for individuals and their workplaces, based on analysis of quantitative and qualitative data supplied by 30 employers in their final fund reports to the TEC. The reports came from 35 employer-led programmes that ran between 2013-2015.

Employers’ reports on programmes funded through the employer-led strand of the Workplace Literacy Fund show:

  • the fund is reaching priority learners, industries and regions
  • gains in literacy and numeracy, but the exact extent of these cannot be determined because of the way they are reported
  • improvements in how workers use their literacy and numeracy skills at work which lead to improved efficiencies in the workplace
  •  improvements in workers’ confidence that leads them to better engage and participate in their workplaces which in turn leads to a more positive workplace culture
  • an inability to report on the extent to which there have been productivity improvements 
  • a range of approaches to sustainability. 

Read the full report here.

Maximising the benefits of the Workplace Literacy Fund

Prepared for the Tertiary Education Commission
Anne Alkema, Heathrose Research 
August 2015

This research reports on where programmes funded through the Workplace Literacy programme were being delivered in 2014 and provides information about good practice in workplace literacy programmes.

Read the full report here.

It shows:

  • programmes are reaching those with lower level literacy and numeracy skills
  • employers and industry and regional stakeholders lack awareness of literacy and numeracy issues in the workplace and what can be done about it
  • providers need to work hard to get employers underway with programmes.

The research also developed a set of good practice indicators for workplace literacy programmes. The indicators relate to:

  • how to start a conversation with employers
  • communication
  • identifying workplace issues
  • planning
  • designing and delivering programmes
  • measuring the impact of programmes
  • sustainability. 

TEC commissioned research about adult literacy and numeracy

Five research reports are summarised here. They cover:

  • the use of Pathways Awarua
  • how industry training organisations embed literacy and numeracy
  • tools to help tertiary education organisations better use evidence to set literacy and numeracy benchmarks
  • the Literacy and Numeracy for Adults Assessment Tool’s contribution to educational outcomes
  • the alignment of adult literacy and numeracy measures.